The first (and only) time I read “The Diary of Anne Frank” was when I was in junior high school, nearly 40 years ago. Somehow, I still remember parts of the story. However, I didn’t know the story of Anne Frank’s father, and how he remarried after his family died in the Holocaust.

On Sunday evening, a lady named Eva Schloss, spoke in Coronado. The event was hosted by Chabad of Coronado and was billed as “A Historic Evening with Anne Frank’s Stepsister, Eva Schloss.” Eva lived in Amsterdam as a child; her family lived in the same neighborhood as Anne Frank. The two were childhood friends and played hopscotch and marbles together, before their families had to go into hiding.

Eva Schloss, now 90 years old, was interviewed onstage at the CoSA Theater on Sunday night and told her story of her family’s time in hiding, of being betrayed and turned over to the Nazis, of the acts of horror she witnessed as a prisoner at Auschwitz. It is beyond comprehension to think that two-thirds of Europe’s Jews died during the Holocaust.

In the final days before liberation of Auschwitz, Eva and her mother found their former neighbor, Otto Frank, who was also a prisoner in the concentration camp. Following the liberation of Auschwitz, the three moved in search of food, and several years later Eva’s mom and Otto were married.

It was a special evening; Mrs. Schloss spoke to a full theater and I was so pleased to see how many young people attended. What an honor it was to have Mrs. Schloss speak in Coronado! Many thanks to all that organized the evening.

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